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The value of asking for advice

The value of asking for advice

At the end of last week, a popular Youtuber known as Supereyepatchwolf released a video on his channel describing the horror of ordering a very expensive PC through the corporate monolith Dell. Not a bad thing, you might think, these kind of companies make it easy to order rigs without too much effort. Generally, this is the case for most people.

Eyepatch however, made a big mistake: he bought his PC based on his own cursory knowledge and what he could find on internet forums. In this modern day and age with access to endless information, it's very tempting to try and make a custom built PC that works for you without paying for what you don't need. Eyepatch was seduced by this idea, and bought a PC worth thousands of Euros, but ended up not ordering parts that effectively rendered his PC into a great big brick. It was incapable of accessing the internet, there was no SSD drive pre-installed and as the video goes on, you think to yourself  "well surely it can't get worse," and then it gets worse. If you haven’t seen the video, it’s very funny.

It’s funny in a schadenfreude sort of way to watch as both a newcomer to PC hardware and those of us who are adept PC surgeons. But to actually be in the situation Eyepatch finds himself in is not something you’d even wish on your worst enemy: hours of waiting in customer service queues, being pushed from pillar to post and treading water only to be disconnected right when you think you might finally be getting somewhere. Not to mention the infuriatingly common slip ups to make if you’re not paying attention.

 

PCs are frustratingly both simple and, paradoxically, complex. Similar to learning a new language, there are rules and methods to speaking it in the most effective and efficient way. For example, individual components in a PC are only programmed to do what they’re told, but if they’re given the wrong set of instructions or cannot access the right instructions, it all starts to go wrong. Much like a stack of dominoes, if you line them up correctly you can make beautiful patterns happen, or the first one will slap to the floor and sit uselessly whilst the other dominoes wait patiently for something to happen.

 

And this is where our dear friend Eyepatch should have asked for help.

 

He did not know the language, or only a very basic understanding of it. And spent thousands of Euros and a couple of sanity points on a PC that had been built as effectively useless, that needed very expensive fixes such as the correct NVME drive that could actually be recognised by his BIOS. He could have saved himself countless hours of being the middle man between customer service and his useless brick of a PC by simply asking questions by people who know their salt when it comes to PCs. Someone maybe like us.

 

We offer services for both newcomers and PC builder veterans alike, and offer a free livechat on our website with access to our technical team to give you all the help you need. If you know nothing about PCs, we offer a wide variety of builds on our website with all the essential parts included, and even a free advice line if you’re deciding which PC will do the job you need it to do. For you PC surgeons, we also offer custom built PCs so we can build your dream PC with the specs that are right for you.

 

Do yourself a favour, and ask for advice. Because advice (from us at least), is free.

 

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